Younger Women: When an Older Man Denies He is Having a Mid-Life Crisis

June 23, 2009 by Nicholl McGuire  
Published in Relationships

You know that your partner is having a mid-life crisis it’s just that he doesn’t. So what do you do when you see that he is changing and you may be the by-product of that change? How do you cope? Article explains.

She didn’t accuse him of having an affair, because that wasn’t the truth; rather she accused him of having a mid-life crisis.  Warning signs of what was ahead, she told him that if he didn’t start doing the following:  eating right, exercising, seeing his doctor, following doctor’s orders, and taking his prescribed medicines that the relationship would be over.  She hadn’t asked for much, at least so she thought, but he felt that she was being pushy, acting like his mother, and he wasn’t going to listen.  In time the relationship went downhill.  He stayed out all night at times with his friends.  He didn’t bother to call when he would be late coming home from work.  He wasn’t interested in having sex with her anymore.  He wanted more out of life and so he quit his job and didn’t tell her until he got a new one months later.  He took monies they saved over the years from a joint savings account and bought toys for himself and trinkets for his admirers.  He hadn’t done the ultimate betrayal, as of yet which was have sex with other women, but he sure was thinking about it.  Given all the porn she found in his computer.  She had a crisis on her hands and he was in denial.

You may know of someone like this and you may have tried to speak some wisdom to him, but he refuses to listen.  Experts say that when a man is having a midlife crisis you are to try to be supportive and don’t belittle him or pressure him to change his ways, rather go along for the ride because at some point he will come to his senses — easier said than done.  The truth is that many men don’t come to their senses until it’s too late.  They move forward into a life that was directed by their hormones and then when they look back they see a trail of tears, broken hearts, debt, and other serious errors.  As old as they are, they refuse to take full responsibility for the mess that they caused.

We make jokes about the man who has his shirt unbutton; wearing a toupee, driving a sports car with a young woman by his side, but it’s no laughing matter.  His cloudy brain has made him indecisive, irrational, illogical, and at times downright strange.  What can we do when he says that he isn’t having a mid-life crisis?  We don’t deny the truth; instead, we just call his attention to the foolish decisions he makes and pray that he sees the light.  We provide him with choices and make him think that he came up with our ideas.  For instance, if we want to go somewhere or eat something different, we recall a time when he may have said something similar and then attribute the idea to him.  “I only cooked this because you said….”  Now this man in a midlife crisis has an attitude that changes from one day to the next.  What he use to eat it he doesn’t eat anymore.  What he use to wear he doesn’t like anymore.  The places he use to frequent are not as exciting as they once were.  He often forgets what you have told him and thinks that you are the one losing it when in all actuality he is losing it.  But you don’t argue and you don’t challenge him.  Instead, you keep the peace by being selective on what is worth fighting about and what isn’t.  Everything is not up for debate unless you want to run him out of your home. 

You always want to take the time to listen to his complaints and concerns and try to make the atmosphere livable.  No, you can’t prevent him from cheating, lying stealing or doing anything else that makes you and the family look bad, but what you can do is have a faith.  Look to something greater than yourself to see him through.  Believe that God is watching and that he will help him through his crisis.

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