The Feminine Hanbok: From Traditional to Fusion

December 14, 2012 by Lady Sunshine  
Published in Beauty

Taking a glimpse at the variations and styles of the women’s hanbok, from the traditional to the modified.

Embraced 
              bodice
  Cascading, 
                 flowing 
                           skirt
    Beautiful, 
                  feminine 
                               form

The women’s hanbok is the traditional dress of Korea, based on the designs from the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1897). The basics of the women’s hanbok consists of two parts: the jeogori - the short, tight blouse or bolero-style jacket; and the chima - the long, high-waisted (bust level) wraparound skirt, creating an elegant silhouette.

The hanbok or chima jeogori ensemble feature some prominent components that are essential for the hanbok. For the jeogori: the git (neck collar), kkeutdong (end of sleeve cuffs) and goreum (coat strings tied into the iconic, single-loop bow, called the otgoreum). For the chimauke geun (shoulder straps), chima margi (high waist) and chima geun (string to tie the chima closed).

Image Source

In modern times, the hanbok has been altered or modified to make it easier or more comfortable to wear, like utilizing buttons or zippers on the jeogori or chima. Fusion hanbok mixes the traditional elements of the hanbok with contemporary fashion, updating its appearance. This not only means modifying the actual look of the hanbok - such as altering the waist or length of the chima and jeogori - but also includes adding trendy accessories, such as strappy pumps or a beaded necklace. 

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4 Responses to “The Feminine Hanbok: From Traditional to Fusion”
  1. Nxwtypx Says:

    I like the more modern takes on this style of clothing. The high waistline of the traditional woman’s hanbok isn’t as flattering of her figure.

  2. Shirley Shuler Says:

    Hi Lady Sunshine, The traditional hanbok is just as beautiful as the modified, I’ll take them all :) .

  3. lonelyplanet Says:

    You have provided good insight of the lost tradition.

  4. Val Mills Says:

    Really enjoyed this, certainly proved the saying, a picture is worth a thousand words


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